Proceedings

EPJ D Highlight - Reading between the lines of highly turbulent plasmas

A short sequence of solitons.

Study shows how to identify highly turbulent plasma signatures in the broadening of the shapes of lines emitted by ions and atoms within

Plasma, the ionised state of matter found in stars, is still not fully understood, largely due to its instability. Astrophysicists have long-since sought to develop models that can account for the turbulent motions inside plasma, based on observing line shapes emitted by atoms and ions in the plasma. Turbulences are typically detected through the observation of broadened lines due to the Doppler effect, similar to the principle behind radar. In a new study published in EPJ D, Roland Stamm from the CNRS and Aix-Marseille University, France, and colleagues develop an iterative simulation model that accurately predicts, for the first time, the changes to the line shape in the presence of strong plasma turbulence. Ultimately, the authors aim to provide a system for assessing plasma turbulence that is valid for both a stellar atmosphere and the ITER tokamak designed to generate fusion energy. Line shapes are extensively employed as a powerful diagnostic tool for detecting turbulences in stable gases and plasmas. For many years now, astrophysicists have developed and employed models that gauge the effect of turbulent motions in the broadening of line shapes due to the Doppler effect. Such models are now also being employed to understand the role of turbulences in plasmas created to harvest energy from fusion.

In this study, the authors review the effects of strong turbulence on the line shapes when the plasma is subjected to an external energy source, such as a beam of charged particles. Their model accounts for the effect of an electric field on a hydrogen atom subjected to strong turbulence within a plasma.

They subsequently perform numerical simulations for various low-density plasmas, ultimately determining that the width of the hydrogen line increases in the presence of strong turbulence connected to the external energy source, shaped as a sequence of solitons. Under such conditions, the line shapes show the presence of waves oscillating at the plasma frequency. Electrostatic waves experience a cycle during which they rise to very high intensities before dissipating and reforming, drawing energy from the driver beam.

This year we decided to make the proceedings of the Workshop available to a wider scientific audience than in previous years. Choosing the media for publishing the papers we had two goals in mind. Firstly, we would like the papers to be in open access, and, secondly, to be indexed in major scientific databases (most notably in Scopus). Among the available choices, we opted for publication in EPJ Web of Conferences due to its international reputation and flexible policy in terms of papers format and publication pricing. The publishing procedure with EPJ was pleasant and smooth, all technical questions were solved in a fast and professional manner. Looking forwards to future collaborations with EPJ Web of Conferences.

Sergey Mishakin, Institute of Applied Physics, Russia
Scientific Secretary of the Workshop, EPJ Web of Conferences vol. 149 (2017)

ISSN: 2100-014X (Electronic Edition)

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